I’m so excited to introduce our very first guest blogger here on Tale of Two Teachers: Paul Abra, from Island Parent Magazine. Paul was a teacher and administrator before becoming publisher of Island Parent Magazine. (He also happens to be Meaghan’s dad!) His post is to share his experience about the parent role with school from his perspective as both a parent and an educator. This is a hot topic as we are kicking off the new school year and both kids and parents are adjusting to the new routines of a different class and teacher. Everyone has their roles in a child’s education but when it comes to a parent’s presence at school, how much is too much? Here’s what he has to say:

Parents need to let go sometimes and especially in schools. Too often, parents want to know everything that’s going on in their child’s day. In the words of parent educator, Barbara Colorosa, these are the helicopter parents, hovering over their child’s every minute and every move. Does this actually teach the child anything about independence and growing up as a self reliant individual? With Mom and Dad controlling every move including trying to choose the teacher and friends, the child is stifled and not prepared for the real world of life.

Schools are sometimes the first instance where children have an opportunity to experience some independence and growth. As parents, our job is to help our children become more independent and self-sufficient, our job is to start to let go. We still need to have rules and boundaries in place but we also need to let our children have space to grow and develop as individuals. Parents need to place trust in teachers, coaches and other adults, to provide their children with mentors and role models beyond the parent.

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Source: Unearthed Comics

We want to hear from parents and teachers:

What are your thoughts on this topic?

Teachers – How much parent involvement is wanted in your classroom?

Parents – What are some ways you have found to help yourself let go and let other adults take on important roles in your child’s life?

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