Hey everyone!

I know, I know, Meaghan and I have both been entirely neglecting our blog lately.  We both have busy lives right now, perhaps busier than ever before!  I may have created a New Year resolution around the concept of “keeping things simple”…another blog post for another time.

For now I’d like to share with you all the online math game that has completely captured the hearts and minds of my grade 7 students.  I am incredibly grateful to a colleague at my grade 8 school for sharing this resource with me.  I just tried this math game last block with my grade 7s and it was hands down the best block of math I’ve ever experienced as a teacher…and I did nothing.

The game is called Prodigy Game and you can access it HERE. Prodigy Game requires the teacher (or parent) to create an account to work from – this process literally took me less than five minutes.  After I created my account I printed off the three step directions for my students so that they had very easy, clear instruction on how to join my account and create their own avatars in order to play.  My students’ process of logging in and creating their avatars was super high energy and fun!  When I was setting up my teacher account I chose the math curriculum prescribed by the game because our BC curriculum is not an option; however, the standard grade 7 math curriculum seemed to work well for my class and we didn’t run in to any issues with questions being too hard or frustrating to accomplish.

My students spent the entire math block (around 45 minutes) playing Prodigy Game in the computer lab.  I witnessed fist pumps when questions were answered correctly, I heard exchanges of, “When you get enough points make sure you buy the pony!” and I even experienced a face to face mini refresh lesson on lowest common denominators.  This game is golden, you guys.  And free.  And so incredibly easy to use.

For me, I think the best part is that now that we have worked in Prodigy Game for a block of time I can go in to my teacher account and see where my students excelled and struggled.  I can see which questions and curricular content is specifically challenging for them.  I can also (this is the coolest part) create my own assignments for either my whole class or individual students and have the students complete my assignments in game playing format.  I especially love this feature because it means I can create lessons for my most struggling learners and they still get to be part of my class and participate in the exact same game as every other student.

This game is genius!  I caught one of our special ed teachers in the hall after math and exploded with excitement while telling her all about this game.  She promptly high-fived me and told me to send her the link, but I already had – ha!

Our math block finished today with one student asking this question as he walked out the door…”Mrs. Alleyn, so…can I log in at home and keep playing this math game?”

My reply: Heck YES!

Try it out with your class or your own children and let us know what you think!

Karley